Alex K Shalek, Ph.D.


Core Member
Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES), Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Pfizer-Laubach Career Development Associate Professor
Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Extramural Member
Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Assistant Investigator
Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Mass General Research Institute
Research Staff
Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital
Institute Member
Broad Institute
Instructor
Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School
AM Harvard University 2006
PhD Harvard University 2011
BA Columbia University 2004
autoimmunity; cancer; cellular heterogeneity; cellular immunology; infectious disease; microfluidic cell preparation; microfluidics; nanobiotechnology; nanowires; single-cell analysis; single-cell genomics; single-cell rna-seq; systems-immunology; technology development

Alex K. Shalek is currently the Pfizer-Laubach Career Development Associate Professor at MIT, as well as a Core Member of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES), an Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and an Extramural Member of The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.  He is also an Associate Member of the Ragon Institute, an Institute Member at the Broad Institute, an Assistant in Immunology at MGH, and an Instructor in Health Sciences and Technology at HMS.  His research is directed towards the development and application of new technologies that facilitate understanding of how cells collectively perform systems-level functions in healthy and diseased states.  Dr. Shalek received his bachelor's degree summa cum laude from Columbia University and his Ph.D. From Harvard University in chemical physics under the guidance of Hongkun Park, and performed postdoctoral training under Hongkun Park and Aviv Regev (Broad/MIT).  To date, his interdisciplinary research has focused on realizing and utilizing nanoscale manipulation and measurement technologies to examine how small components (molecules, cells) drive systems of vast complexity (cellular responses, population behaviors).